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Vandals destroy mailboxes in one neighborhood, could face federal charges

When you look at the brand new mailboxes on one street in Vidor, there's no sign of what prompted the replacements.

A picture of the damage makes it very clear.

"It angers the community because we work hard for our things," said Donna Webb. "We don't mess with anybody's stuff and we don't want anybody messing with our stuff."

Donna Webb lives on Kent Street. Late Easter night into early Monday morning, vandals smashed about five mailboxes.

"We have important documents and bills coming in," said Webb. "We just like people to leave our mailboxes alone."

They didn't touch her mailbox--this time. She was a victim one year ago.

"It was very hard to open up the lid because it was smashed on the sides. It was very frustrating."

Now, like others on the street, Webb is putting up a steel mailbox. It's more durable and harder to knock down.

"They should know. A lot of the neighbors have installed steel and iron mailboxes, so if someone comes along and hits them with the wrong tool, they're going to get hurt pretty bad."

According to the U.S. Postal Inspection Service website, damaging a mailbox is considered a federal crime.

Anyone convicted could face fines of up to $250,000 and up to three years in jail for each mailbox damaged.

Webb just wants the vandals to stay away from her street--and from her neighbors' mailboxes.

"We're calm people, we're clean people, and we don't go around messing with anything of anyone else's, and we would just appreciate it if they wouldn't mess with our stuff."

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